The Triune Brain and its implications in the #English classroom

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Dr. Paul Mac Lean developed the theory of the Triune brain.
It states that our brain evolved in three different stages: the reptilian brain, the mammalian brain and finally the neo cortex or human brain. As a result, humans don’t have one brain but three. Newer and more elaborate structures were added to the old and integrated into a functional whole. Each of these brains are located differently in the mind and have different evolutionary functions.
Let’s have a look at each of them and the implications they have in the classroom.

The Reptilian Brain
It is the lowest and most primitive part of the brain and we share it with all other animals which have a backbone. It evolved during the Triassic period. It is connected to the spinal cord and its main function is to guarantee survival. It releases chemicals to face the “fight or flight” response. It also controls other functions to sustain life such as heart rate, breathing, digestion and sleeping.

In the class:
A secure environment in the classroom will keep it at ease and it will promote an effective learning. A stress free class will help students to think reflexively rather than reflectively.
Tip: Playing classical or chill out music in the background will help students feel relaxed and ready for learning.

Mammalian Brain
It evolved after the reptilian brain during the Jurassic period and it is located in the limbic system. The mammalian or emotional brain contains these important organs
· Hypothalamus : for the automatic control of body functions such as digestion, body temperature and blood pressure
· Hippocampus: for storing experience-based memories.
· Amygdala: For recognizing danger and for responding to this according to past experienc

In the class:
Under stress, the emotional brain hinders learning and downshifts to the reptilian brain to ensure survival. When the mammalian brain is in a positive and relaxed state it releases endorphins which in turn triggers a powerful neurotransmitter called acetylcholine which favors learning.
Tip: Create a positive environment in the classroom, put up posters with uplifting phrases, smile and show a great enthusiasm for learning. Happiness is really contagious so if the teacher is happy students will be happy too!

Neocortex
The neocortex with its great amount of grey matter was added to the mammalian brain. It evolved with the first primates. It is also called the human brain and its main functions are: planning, creating, setting goals, speaking, regulating decision making and learning among others. Higher order thinking takes place here.

In class:
First of all, the brain will function properly only if it is appropriately fed and has reasonable hours of sleep. If those conditions are met then we can proceed to teaching.
Connect the new topic with previous knowledge, making connections helps the brain to look for and store information.
What is taught should be relevant and significant in students’ lives. The rain learns best when it learns in a real world context. Using activities similar to real life will enhance learning (projects, stories, field trips)
Help children to construct information instead of providing them with answers.
Dividing content into smaller chunks helps understanding. The brain can retain up to seven bites of information. This can vary from human to human to 5-9 bites.
Provide students with time to reflect and create.

Tip: METACOGNITION – Allow students opportunities to examine their own metacognitive skills. Give them time to think and explore their own thinking and learning patterns.The Triune Brain and its implications in the classroom
octubre 20, 2018
The Triune Brain and its implications in the classroom

Dr. Paul Mac Lean developed the theory of the Triune brain. It states that our brain evolved in three different stages: the reptilian brain, the mammalian brain and finally the neo cortex or human brain. As a result, humans don’t have one brain but three. Newer and more elaborate structures were added to the old and integrated into a functional whole. Each of these brains are located differently in the mind and have different evolutionary functions.
Let’s have a look at each of them and the implications they have in the classroom.

The Reptilian Brain
It is the lowest and most primitive part of the brain and we share it with all other animals which have a backbone. It evolved during the Triassic period. It is connected to the spinal cord and its main function is to guarantee survival. It releases chemicals to face the “fight or flight” response. It also controls other functions to sustain life such as heart rate, breathing, digestion and sleeping.

In the class:
A secure environment in the classroom will keep it at ease and it will promote an effective learning. A stress free class will help students to think reflexively rather than reflectively.
Tip: Playing classical or chill out music in the background will help students feel relaxed and ready for learning.

Mammalian Brain
It evolved after the reptilian brain during the Jurassic period and it is located in the limbic system. The mammalian or emotional brain contains these important organs
· Hypothalamus : for the automatic control of body functions such as digestion, body temperature and blood pressure
· Hippocampus: for storing experience-based memories.
· Amygdala: For recognizing danger and for responding to this according to past experienc

In the class:
Under stress, the emotional brain hinders learning and downshifts to the reptilian brain to ensure survival. When the mammalian brain is in a positive and relaxed state it releases endorphins which in turn triggers a powerful neurotransmitter called acetylcholine which favors learning.
Tip: Create a positive environment in the classroom, put up posters with uplifting phrases, smile and show a great enthusiasm for learning. Happiness is really contagious so if the teacher is happy students will be happy too!

Neocortex
The neocortex with its great amount of grey matter was added to the mammalian brain. It evolved with the first primates. It is also called the human brain and its main functions are: planning, creating, setting goals, speaking, regulating decision making and learning among others. Higher order thinking takes place here.

In class:
First of all, the brain will function properly only if it is appropriately fed and has reasonable hours of sleep. If those conditions are met then we can proceed to teaching.
Connect the new topic with previous knowledge, making connections helps the brain to look for and store information.
What is taught should be relevant and significant in students’ lives. The rain learns best when it learns in a real world context. Using activities similar to real life will enhance learning (projects, stories, field trips)
Help children to construct information instead of providing them with answers.
Dividing content into smaller chunks helps understanding. The brain can retain up to seven bites of information. This can vary from human to human to 5-9 bites.
Provide students with time to reflect and create.

Tip: METACOGNITION – Allow students opportunities to examine their own metacognitive skills. Give them time to think and explore their own thinking and learning patterns.

Also check THE COMPREHENSIVE TEACHER

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Comprehensive-English-Teacher-TEFL-Companion/dp/1724527657/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1540104121&sr=1-2&refinements=p_27%3AJesse+Craignou%2Cp_n_feature_browse-bin%3A400530011

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